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7 Super-Quick Ways to Boost Your Energy

By Kate Rockwood | March 5, 2018 | Rally Health

Americans are tired — seriously. Three out of four of us reported feeling tired many days of the week, according to a survey of more than 1,000 people. And while healthy habits — like staying active, eating well, and getting enough sleep — are the most meaningful ways to boost your energy, it is possible to feel perky and refreshed in a matter of minutes. And, no, we don’t mean by reaching for the nearest energy drink.

Giggle at Cats

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Seriously. Nodding off at your desk? Take a few minutes to indulge in whatever goofy of-the-moment online meme or video trend you’re currently obsessed with. Cat videos? Go for it. Watermelon dresses? Enjoy.  A 2015 study published in the Journal of Business and Psychology found that the exposure to humor doesn’t just make you feel better, it actually has replenishing and energizing effects. In fact, the study goes so far as to recommend that organizations embrace a work culture of playful moments to keep employee persistence high.

Down a Glass of Water

In addition to benefiting your muscles, joints, and heart health, water is imperative to keep you alert and energized during the day, says Lori Zanini, RD, a nutritionist and certified diabetes educator. “Your fluid intake can benefit your body immediately,” in part because it may help protect against high blood sugar, she says.

And even mild dehydration can leave you dragging. A 2011 study by the University of Connecticut and the University of Arkansas found that dehydration can quickly lead to a decline in mood, an increase in fatigue, and in increase in the perceived difficulty of cognitive tasks. Meaning, not only will you probably check off your list of to-do things at a slower rate, but the task will feel more daunting than it really is. Feeling a little parched when your energy slumps? Drink up!

Smell Peppermint

Here’s a weird one: The aroma of mint, researchers found, may enhance memory, and increase alertness. And other studies have linked peppermint oil to greater physical performance, as well. Put a few drops of essential peppermint oil on a diffuser, then let the energizing aroma do its thing!

Take the Stairs

Feeling sluggish? Start climbing. A new study by researchers at the University of Georgia’s College of Education found that office workers who walked up and down stairs at a comfortable, low-intensity pace finished the task feeling energized. In fact, stair climbers felt more recharged than participants who downed 50 milligrams of caffeine, which is about the amount in a standard cup of coffee or soda. So next time you’re feeling sluggish, put your feet to work.

Go Ahead and Sip a Cup of Joe

Speaking of coffee: For most people, there’s no need to feel guilty about getting a quick pick-me-up from a cup of joe. Two separate 2017 studies found that drinkers of coffee — which is full of good stuff like antioxidants — may actually have longer lives than non-drinkers. Just be mindful of the clock when you’re drinking caffeine, says Rania Batayneh, MPH, nutritionist and author of The One One One Diet. “Having coffee in the late afternoon or evening can interfere with your sleep later on.” So this is an energy boost best used in the morning.

Upgrade Your Snack

If you’ve been munching chips all afternoon or are feeling ravenous, your energy slump might be crashing blood sugar, says Zanini. For an energy boost that won’t leave you bottomed up in an hour, reach for a snack that includes fiber and protein, she says. Both digest slowly, which means your blood sugar won’t spike (and then plummet), and they’ll leave you feeling sated for longer.

Hummus and whole-wheat crackers or carrots is Batayneh’s energizing snack of choice, or a piece of fruit and a handful of almonds. If you can sneak in some extra water, more energy to you. “Cucumbers and watermelon are mostly water,” says Zahini, “so they deliver an extra hydration boost as well.”

Embrace Nature

Researchers have found that simply being outside and in nature can boost vitality. The sights and sounds of nature, it seems, have a calming impact on our bodies and minds. (Not to mention, an extra small dose of Vitamin D may be a welcome bonus.)

The benefits of nature can even help your energy levels if you’re stuck in the house or at your desk all day. In 2015, researchers at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute found that playing natural sounds — a flowing stream, for example — in an inside environment can lead to increased productivity.   

 

Kate Rockwood
Rally Health