High Blood Pressure

Known as the silent killer, high blood pressure is a very common condition that usually doesn’t have any symptoms and can lead to strokes and heart attacks. In fact, about one in three adults in the US has it, and only about half of them have it under control. A number of things can cause high blood pressure, but medicines and a healthy lifestyle — including eating right and exercising — can help prevent or lower high blood pressure.

Jump To+

Causes and Risk Factors

What causes blood pressure to go up or down? A number of things, from lifestyle habits to medications. Other important factors include a family history of high blood pressure, getting older, eating a lot of salt, or being overweight.

Learn More

Prevention

Even if high blood pressure runs in your family, diet and exercise can play a big role in preventing or improving it. Eat healthy, keep your salt intake down, and exercise regularly to help avoid high blood pressure.

Learn More

Symptoms and Diagnosis

High blood pressure doesn’t usually have obvious symptoms, so you may not even know you have it until you get your blood pressure checked, perhaps during a routine visit to the doctor. Your doctor can tell you if your blood pressure numbers are a problem, and may ask you to do additional monitoring.

Learn More

Complications

Left untreated, high blood pressure can lead to a hardening of the arteries, which can cause problems throughout your body, including heart disease, abnormal heartbeat, kidney failure, or eye damage. But simple steps like eating healthy and getting exercise can help lower your blood pressure and prevent these complications.

Learn More

Treatment

Medicines and maintaining healthy lifestyle habits are the two main ways to lower your blood pressure. You may need to take one or two drugs to get it under control, and your doctor will help you find the best approach.

Learn More

Self-Care and Management

Taking medicine and leading a healthy lifestyle are the two main ways to prevent or reduce high blood pressure. Losing even 10 pounds can make a big difference in lowering your blood pressure. Your doctor may also ask you to check your blood pressure regularly at home.

Learn More

Causes & Risk Factors

Learn More

Prevention

Learn More

Symptoms & Diagnosis

Learn More

Complications

Learn More

Treatment

Learn More

Self-Care & Management

Learn More

Causes & Risk Factors

Learn More

Prevention

Learn More

Symptoms & Diagnosis

Learn More

Complications

Learn More

Treatment

Learn More

Self-Care & Management

Learn More